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Cnc router with rotary axis.

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by Jedivman, Nov 21, 2017.

  1. Jedivman

    Jedivman New
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    Hello from Michigan.

    I am presently designing a 4' x 4' 3 axis cnc router, I'm building this for cutting tapers on pool cue butts and shafts that I will be building. My thought was to mount my lathe bed to the table of the router for spinning the wood low speeds for roughing and high speeds for finishing.

    I also need a dedicated 4th axis for cutting inlays, pockets, butterfly joints and other work. The lathe is a custom fabricated unit using all Taig lathe components and will have a 3/4hp DC motor belt driven to give me adjustable speed while maintaining maximum torque at low rpm for times I have to do coring work on cues.

    My question is, am I better off with 2 lathe beds on the one table, 1 for indexing and one for 2000 rpm, or can i incorporate them both into one unit? I assume I could mount a stepper motor with a pulley opposite of the dc drive motor and switch belts from one to the other depending on the process I need to do.

    This is all very new to me so I apologize if I'm am using improper terminology or not describing what I need as good as I should. I appreciate any input you guys can offer me. This will be constructed predominantly of 80/20 for all structural components, a MDF bed for a sacrificial surface yet added strength. I am still on the fence about the linear components but I am leaning towards 20mm round slides with ball screws for both X and Y, and undecided yet on the X carriage yet. I have no idea on electronic yet and I am very open to suggestions.

    I know working with wood does not usually compare to working with metal as far as the tolerances or precision factor, but high end fully spliced and half spliced cue sticks are the exception as everything has to be perfect or better.

    Thanks in advance! I will post a nice build log with pictures once I am done with the design and start working on it.
     
  2. Kevon Ritter

    Kevon Ritter Veteran
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    Any cutting tool works by moving a cutting edge against material. On a lathe, the material spins against a fixed tool. On a mill, the tool spins against a fixed material.

    With that said, putting both on the same table in pointless. You only end up with more positioning issues and an entirely extra step that. A lathe is 2 axis. A mill will a rotary axis is a 4 axis.

    At least, that's my thought process.

    Kev
     
  3. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
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  4. Jedivman

    Jedivman New
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    I looked at both of those builds and I commend thier efforts and construction, and i bet they both do what is required of them. That said I seems to me they are both fixed gantry with only 2 axis. If that is the case it is just an inverted cnc operated compound cross slide like you would find on a metal lathe.

    It seems like a rather expensive approach to just adding a simple duplicator or a set of taper bars to a standard wood lathe, but I could be wrong as I usually am.

    I need the ability to do full 4 axis work when it comes to cutting a full splice in a butt and forearm, cutting intricate inlay pockets into the butt around the circumference and also cut the female portion of the inlay from flat stock to go into the pockets.

    I also need it to run high rpms for standard square to round and round to taper.

    I am asking a lot of one machine and could build a few, and down the road I will, but for now the need for the machine is there, the budget for only 1 machine for now is also there. Im sure what I need can be made, I'm not sure if my concept of it will work.
     
  5. Jedivman

    Jedivman New
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    Here is Align-rite $10,000.00 solution for what I need but with many many flaws and downsides. Also, it still will not perform all of the functions that I need.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Jedivman

    Jedivman New
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    It is a retrofitted wood lathe with a 3 axis router mounted on top of the lathe with 2 belt driven motors to run the lathe. 1 for high speed rounding and tapering and a stepper motor for when indexing is needed for inlays and cutting an array of splices.

    It is to large, to hard to access the material being worked on with the orientation of the machine constantly over the lathe. Also no working area for cutting out the inlays from ivory or what ever material I need to cut.

    I need a wood lathe, a metal lathe, a 3 axis router and a 4 axis machine, but all incorporated into one unit.

    It will not be an easy build, but in the end can be done, will be unique and fun. Fully functional for exotic full splice cue construction and have a ton of other capabilities.

    I just have to decide what to design, design it, order a lot of stuff and incorporate my very unique custom cue building lathe onto it.

    Sounds like a challenge.
     
  7. Jedivman

    Jedivman New
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    Here is another commercially available 4 axis machine made specifically for "most" aspects of cue building, and a $8100.00 price tag. Without the actual lathe capabilities of having a through center head stock with a 4 jaw chuck, a additional slide carriage for cutting tennos and the ability to trim a ferrule and shape a cue tip or the ability to handle an air assisted coring bar for coring the entire length of the butt and forearm.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Kevon Ritter

    Kevon Ritter Veteran
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    Duplicating is a function of having a CNC.

    I think you are seriously overthinking it. Just put a rotary axis on any 3 axis machine. If you only want it for rotary work, then just build a skinny and long machine. Something like a 250x1000.
     
    GrayUK likes this.

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