Welcome to Our Community

Some features disabled for guests. Register Today.

Lead CNC with Xpro v4 board or MKS 3/4 with542 drivers

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by adt670456, Jan 5, 2019.

  1. adt670456

    adt670456 New
    Builder

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey just curious. I recently ordered the lead CNC machine, everything on the bundle page except for the out of stock NEMA 23 high torque motors. After reading many post I’m starting to question the ability of the Xpro v4 board and being able to use the 23 high torque motors. Will the motors be limited by the drivers on the v4’s board? If so, how much? I’m looking to use the machine to cut multiple types of material including aluminum. I’m just wanting to double check because my order has not yet been shipped and if I need to do the mks3/4 board with the 542MA driver then I’ll call and change it. Or can I reliably hookup external drivers to the Xpro v4 board and get the most out of the motors?

    Thanks
     
  2. Peter Van Der Walt

    Peter Van Der Walt OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Resident Builder Project Maker Contest Winner! Builder

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2017
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    313
    The XPRO can deliver up to 2.5A, the High Torque motors are 3.0A, for optimal use with the high torque motors, refer to Hooking Up External Drivers to the CNC xPRO V3 (at the time of writing, Spark Concepts has not provided an updated article for the procedure for the V4, however it is even easier as the pinouts are now on screw terminals on the V4) for adding DQ542MA drivers. If you are looking at the MK3/4 checkout Blog - PlanetCNC for some examples of the interesting things it can do too
     
  3. halfshavedyaks

    halfshavedyaks Journeyman
    Builder

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2018
    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    6
    If you use external drivers you don't need an Xpro a regular arduino will do.
     
  4. adt670456

    adt670456 New
    Builder

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    So I can basically just get an Arduino and upload the open builds software and that’s it. What’s the major differences between openbuilds v4 board and an Arduino board?
    What Arduino board would be the best?
     
  5. Jacob Lotter

    Jacob Lotter Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2018
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    14
    The difference between the Spark Concepts xPro v4 board is that It had drives integrated within the board. This eliminates the need for external drives. There are many boards out there offered by Pokeys, SainSmart, Ethernet smooth stepper, or Arduino based systems (CNC Micro-controllers). Many of these will need their own software such as UCCNC, Mach, etc. The nice things about the Spark Concepts controllers offered through open builds is that you can use them with the Openbuilds G-code software easily, which is a cheap and easy solution.

    The Spark Concepts boards can also use external drives if need be! Which makes them extremely universal controller if integrating larger motors is in the future.
     
    Peter Van Der Walt likes this.
  6. Peter Van Der Walt

    Peter Van Der Walt OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Resident Builder Project Maker Contest Winner! Builder

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2017
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    313
    And, no wiring knowledge needed... For well versed hackers, the bare arduino is great, but most folks, find that daunting, the little bit you spend extra saves a lot of time, headache and potential for failure...
     
  7. halfshavedyaks

    halfshavedyaks Journeyman
    Builder

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2018
    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    6
    If you want an easy turnkey solution with good documentation get the Xpro or some similar integrated board. The Xpro is essentially a Uno with drivers built onto the same board.

    If you want a more robust modular solution and are prepared to do some learning and a fair bit of manual wiring and making decisions about the best way to wire stuff together then use the external drivers and a plain arduino , a uno will do.

    With my Workbee I use grbl firmware on the uno and UGS (universal gcode sender) on the computer to send the instructions. IIRC that's the same software setup many people use with the Xpro. It's a good vanilla starting point - there are other options.

    There's no complete instructions out there in one place, but this video shows a good start on DQ542 wiring drivers to a uno. In fact it shows a few different methods - rather more than you need to get going. However understanding all the methods helps you be clear about what the hardware can do.

    UNO GRBL DQ542MA Wiring Methods

    The external drivers are definitely a better solution, but as above posts have mentioned it is definitely more work. On the plus side you'll understand your system better if you do the learning.

    It depends a lot on how much time you are willing to spend learning about the hardware before you start cutting anything.
     
    Peter Van Der Walt likes this.
  8. Giarc

    Giarc Master
    Moderator Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2015
    Messages:
    974
    Likes Received:
    475
    If you get an Arduino you can use the Arduino IDE software to load GRBL onto it. You need the software for the drivers to run GRBL and it makes installing GRBL to the board a lot easier.

    The major difference between and GENUINE arduino ($23.51) board controlling external drivers and the Xpro is about $125 more for the Xpro ($149.99).

    The best Arduino board is a genuine Arduino board because for an extra $6-10, you know it will work. I have never had any of my genuine Arduino boards malfunction. The one Chinese clone Uno I purchased (Sainsmart brand) for my CNC failed within a month.
     
    #8 Giarc, Jan 12, 2019 at 4:19 PM
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019 at 4:30 PM

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice