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TinyG Controller and DQ542MA stepper motors?

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by Moniker, Oct 19, 2017.

  1. Moniker

    Moniker New
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    I’m building my OpenBuild Cbeam XL and using a TinyG as my controller with a 36V, Mouser power supply. I additionally purchased 4 DQ542MA Stepper Motor Drivers. From everything I have been reading the TinyG may not need the additional drivers, but I want to ensure that I get a smooth movement along the X,Y,Z axis. Does anyone know who to wire up this configuration? Is it not needed? Any tips would be helpful. Noob level 1 so don’t beat me up.
     
  2. Peter Van Der Walt

    Peter Van Der Walt OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Resident Builder Project Maker Contest Winner! Builder

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    Moniker likes this.
  3. Flash22

    Flash22 Veteran
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    You shouldn't need to run the TinyG, as there individual drivers you can wire them direct to the Arduino - my current setup is a GShield that runs X and Z and a DM542 that runs both of the Y steppers - I will be going to higher torque steppers so the GShield will be on/over its limit - It all depends on what steppers you running

    This may be of some use assuming your using grbl

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Flash22

    Flash22 Veteran
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    If you have the openbuilds hi torque steppers (325 oz) they pull 4 amp (Max) - you will need the DQ542 drivers, The TinyG is only rated to a max of 1.9 amps (dr8811 driver chips iirc)

    your psu may be a issue as well as it will need to be a min of 8 amps
     
  5. Moniker

    Moniker New
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    Ive seen a couple of builds using the TinyG and the High Torque steppers, they should be good, but Ill havebto look at specs, to make sure myself, thanks.

    The TinyG requires a 24V PS, so I had to get one of those. I accidentally ordered a 36V. So Lets say I want to use the steppers and not the TinyG is the Arduino Uno, or Mega the way to go?
     
  6. Flash22

    Flash22 Veteran
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    the 4 divers are the way to go, stepper motors are a mine field as you can get all sorts inc hi torque, low current ones what are fine for the all in one boards

    these max rating are the maximum current they draw at a stall current

    Arduino wise the uno is the most common, I have used ones like the nano, micro and mega for other projects, its worth going for the genuine Arduino uno as they seem more stable (in my use cases)
     
  7. Moniker

    Moniker New
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    What is needed for Ardunio CNC? Looks like I need a UNO R3 Controller board and a CNC shield V3.0 and the DQ542MA Stepper Motor Drivers
     
  8. Flash22

    Flash22 Veteran
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    The Arduino and DQ524 drivers is all you need - you do not need any shields or a TinyG (Thay are just motor drivers)

    Use the 2 pictures above and wire them up install grbl on the uno and away you go

    This maybe of some help

     
    #8 Flash22, Oct 23, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2017
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  9. Joe Santarsiero

    Joe Santarsiero OB addict
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

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    The dq542mas would like the 36v(and 48v).
     
  10. ChadRat6458

    ChadRat6458 Journeyman
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    I like LinuxCNC with Mesa 5i25/7I76 plug and play kit to run the drivers. Really easy to get things moving.
     
  11. Flash22

    Flash22 Veteran
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    Linux isn't for every one and a system like the mesa isn't cheap and tbh is over kill on a machine like the c beam - wow really its almost half the cost of a C Beam mechanical kit

    Grbl is tried and tested even autocad support it out the box at a fraction of the cost
     
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  12. Moniker

    Moniker New
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    What about PS, should I use the 36V or the 24?
    I was going to run the 24 for the TinyG, limit switches and misc, and run the 36v for the steppers. I picked up a Ardunio uno online yesterday so I can eventually test that out. Does wiring color matter? Should I follow standards or does it not much matter?
     
  13. Moniker

    Moniker New
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    Thats a little overpriced at the moment. Im still much a noob, so maybe eventually Ill go to this level. From the live machines I have seen. TinyG and or Ardunio work fine for now.
     
  14. Flash22

    Flash22 Veteran
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    You do not need the TinyG !!! only power you need is to the drivers, limit switches are wired off the Arduino

    Keep it simple, trust me I have been there,
     
    Joe Santarsiero likes this.
  15. ChadRat6458

    ChadRat6458 Journeyman
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    LinuxCNC and Mesa is cheaper than Mach 3. I was just giving him more options to choose from. Grbl isn't that great. The universal gcode sender program isn't that great. I like LinuxCNC. You can go grbl or mach 3 or whatever. Whichever route you take then more power to you. In the end, he will need to look at the different options and go with what he thinks is best.
     
  16. ChadRat6458

    ChadRat6458 Journeyman
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    My first build I went with LinuxCNC and a simple C10 breakout board. This was after I got tired of messing with a board that had built in drivers. I was not impressed with the universal gcode sender and grbl. With my current build, I was planning on going the BOB route again. I finished some good paying projects. I decided to spurge on the Mesa boards. It was nice to get everything set up and running in one evening.
     
  17. Flash22

    Flash22 Veteran
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    tbh these are hobby grade machines, never had a issue with grbl even with the most complex g-code fusion 360 can throw at it

    For a hobby user cost is a major factor the likes of mach 4 hobby is $200 for the software the last time I looked it was still based on 10-15 year old tech using parallel

    As for Mesa, PC or PC104 base, fpga board, then drivers and you into a lot of money for features your never use and requirements your never need
     

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