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Thread Rod NEMA 17 mount plate in mid-rail?

Discussion in 'General Talk' started by Awestruck, Jun 7, 2018.

  1. Awestruck

    Awestruck Journeyman
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    Is it possible to take something like the Threaded Rod Plate - NEMA 17 Stepper Motor, and to use it in mid-rail? It looks like this plate is typically applied at the end of the rail via screws and threading in the V-Slot. However, what if I were to use something like Black Angle Corner Connector on top and bottom, would it line up and have enough room for screws/t-nut into the V-slot and then screw/net through the blocks and plate?
     
  2. Awestruck

    Awestruck Journeyman
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    As I think more about this, what I would love is some right angle version of the "Threaded Rod Plate - NEMA 17 Stepper Motor" so that it can easily bolt to the slots on the channel. Maybe there is a bracket like this available from another source if not OpenBuilds?
     
  3. Awestruck

    Awestruck Journeyman
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    So thinking and googling a bit more, I decided to sketch an idea out in Fusion360.

    Below is a bracket that would be used for NEMA 17 stepper motors to attach to V-Slot 20x40 rail, or larger. The bracket also incorporates the same features so that this could be used for thread rod bearings being recessed. Therefore a basic installation could use two of these, one to hold the stepper and the other at the far end for the threaded rod.

    The stepper would be just a little bit larger than this bracket, as the NEMA 17 stepper is 42.3mm square and the rail is 40mm wide.

    M3 screws are used to attach the stepper. I gave a little recess for these. Similarly M5 low profile screw would be used for mounting to the rail with tee nuts.

    What do you think of this design?

    2018-06-07_18-24-09.png
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
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    Fairly simple to make your own using cuts from a 1-3/4" x 1/8" angle. And by swapping the regular bearing for a flanged bearing you just cut a simple hole and do not have to deal with cutting the bearing recess. You might also consider extending the base leg and using 4 screws to increase stability.
     
  5. Awestruck

    Awestruck Journeyman
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    Thank you @Rick 2.0 for the comments. Let me echo back to see if I understand.

    You recommend fashioning this from easy to source tools and materials.
    Take something like this: https://www.onlinemetals.com/merchant.cfm?pid=981&step=4&showunits=inches&id=62&top_cat=60
    Making standard holes.
    And Voila - I've got something that works.

    I like it. Simple. Gets the job done. Perhaps not as cool as what I drew, but it works.

    What did you mean by "extending the base leg and using 4 screws to increase stability"? Did you mean four screws into the V-Slot? I already have four screws into the stepper.
     
  6. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
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    Yes.
    Just round off the corners and paint it black. Nobody will notice its not quite as cool.

    BTW, if you're ordering from the source noted, try code SDC8A at checkout. It should save you $5 off shipping.
     
  7. Awestruck

    Awestruck Journeyman
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    Thank you again @Rick 2.0!

    Looking at the design with fresh eyes this morning, I'm thinking through the entire assembly and how the threaded rod and nut block and gantry fit into this picture now. The design presented was to keep the NEMA17 motor snug against the V-Slot, though that may mean the axis through the shaft and threaded rod don't fit will with "off the shelf" components.

    On a typical NEMA 17 Linear Actuator with threaded rod, judging by the dimensions on the plate drawings, the center line of the threaded rod would be about ~12.5mm off the surface of the channel (NEMA 17 plate has it 12.43mm and NEMA 23 plate has it 12.5mm). This distance allows for a nut block under a gantry carriage that has riser blocks. I should sketch out what the dimension would be for a nut block on top of a standard gantry (no riser) and then on top of a gantry + plus V-SLOT 20mm. Then I'll likely have to adjust my design as I suspect I'll have to move the motor out a bit to get a good centerline.

    On the other hand.....I could fabricate some plate or mount and use spacers to make this design work. Geeesshhh! I wish I just had all more making tools like a C-Beam machine sitting around. Though I do have access to a Glowforge laser and Shaper Origin, for the moment. Hmmm....
     
  8. Kevon Ritter

    Kevon Ritter Master
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    If you were planning on printing what you drew, it won't even be a quarter of the strength of the aluminum angle. A printed part can't be designed like sheet metal.
    If you were planning on machining it from a solid block of aluminum, then that's a different story.
     
  9. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
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    So how is the Shaper Origin to work with? They're so new I haven't seen much feedback on them yet.
     
  10. Awestruck

    Awestruck Journeyman
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    Thanks for the feedback @Kevon Ritter At the moment I'm simply sketching out a couple ideas. My leaning is towards having it made out of AL, as I prefer that for the key parts of a machine. I've not done design for 3D printing yet, though I've been starting to watch a lot of videos in the past few weeks on 3D Printing. I don't have a 3D printer yet, however that is why I am thinking about this plate as I'm curious to make one. Something that is like a Tevo Tornado or CR-10s. Even though those machines are so cheap, I like the challenge of designing something better and yet trying to make it inexpensive with all the parts in it that I would like like genuine hot ends, 400 step steppers, etc.

    @Rick 2.0 For the four screw bolting into the V-Slot/tee nut, what spacing would you recommend for the screws along the v-slot?

    I like the Shaper Origin in that it is a very easy and accessible tool for someone who may have little experience or is nervous for working with power tools. My four year old son was able to use the tool in some basics ways with my supervision. I could see an 8 or 10 year old being able to do this work just fine as the tool is probably too heavy for a four year old.

    I've made several things out of wood with it and I like the precision. I'm not much of a wood worker per se, I'm more of a maker and engineer, and so being able to sketch something in CAD or drawing program and then moments later cut it out is very satisfying. I also like that I can take the tool to the work piece. Someday I'd love a 4' x 8' CNC router. I'd still have a Shaper Origin in my set up though because sometimes a large machine is too much to take to the work piece or wall or floor or job site or where ever you need to do the cut. I don't think I'd use Shaper on metal, I just don't want to get chips into the precision machine. I've done wood, plastic and carbon fiber thus far.

    For my space, I like having the Shaper. Though it means it takes my time. A nice CNC router I can set it and it runs while I mange some other things. With Shaper I have to manually do all the large movements. It works though for what I've needed it. I'd love to see libraries loan out a tool like this, it can enable a lot of cool creating.
     
    Rick 2.0 likes this.

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