Welcome to Our Community

Some features disabled for guests. Register Today.

Perpendicular axis, OX CNC

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by Anton, May 30, 2018.

  1. Anton

    Anton New
    Builder

    Joined:
    May 23, 2014
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello community, i have problem with my OX - X and Y axis are slightly non-perpendicular. As a result, the part damages after 2-side machining.
    Help me please, how i should fix this problem and how i can make my OX more rigid?
     
  2. David the swarfer

    David the swarfer OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2013
    Messages:
    984
    Likes Received:
    446
    this was discussed just the other day...
    and this video was also released just last week.
     
  3. wiremonkey

    wiremonkey Journeyman
    Builder

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2017
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    12
    A more rudimentary way of squaring things up is to bring the gantry close to the front, power down, then put a ruler on each gantry and measure each from the front. Adjust until they match. Not as exact as the video presented, but I do this all the time and it works well.

    As to stiffening, hmmmm, long subject. I'm not directly familiar with the "OX," but I built a Sphinx and it's similar, a bit more stout. I've been making videos of my steps toward making the machine more rigid, with the end goal, milling aluminum. But, despite my efforts, the c-beam is simply not a good choice when it comes to the X beam, it twists in the middle. It's fine for routing softer materials, like wood, acrylic, etc, and I love it for that, but harder woods and softer metals, are difficult. The machine you show here, the OX, has a very thin Z axis, you could start there, but really your major issue is the long X beam. In my opinion, you should start there and upgrade to a steel beam of some sort. I've made some videos about my trials and tribulations over the last few weeks, you can see them here:

    In your video, however, it looks like your belts are too loose. Tighten them up and it should take care of that play.

    I'll be posting a summary video soon about taking this machine to the next level with a steel X axis. I'm researching the smartest, cheapest, designs now.

    Good luck!
     
  4. David the swarfer

    David the swarfer OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2013
    Messages:
    984
    Likes Received:
    446
    I used a spring balance to pull my belts to 6kg of tension.
    I did this mostly because I figure knowing what the tension is, and having them all the same , is better than guessing.
    so far, 6kg is enough but I have no idea what is better/good/preferred.
     
  5. wiremonkey

    wiremonkey Journeyman
    Builder

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2017
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    12
    Springs are less than ideal in a system that must remain rigid in order to maintain accuracy, especially since there is a heavy cutting motor that needs to rapidly change directions. I use lead screws. I know some folks who have belts use a bolt tensioner. Anyone care to elaborate?
     
  6. David the swarfer

    David the swarfer OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2013
    Messages:
    984
    Likes Received:
    446
    no, the springs are no in the system, I just used the spring balance to pull the belts to a known tension, then locked them in place.
     
  7. wiremonkey

    wiremonkey Journeyman
    Builder

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2017
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    12
    Ah, gotcha! Some folks leave them inline to take up tension.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice