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MiniMill Smoothie

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by Andrew Helsel, Jul 9, 2017.

  1. Andrew Helsel

    Andrew Helsel Well-Known
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  2. Julius

    Julius Veteran
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    motors do not overload drivers, its the other way around. You can power 400A motors with a 2A driver if you want, but it will be 1/200th of the strength. Get some TB6600 drivers instead and dont have the electronics on the machine!
     
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  3. Andrew Helsel

    Andrew Helsel Well-Known
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    Ah, I clearly forgot about how DC current draw works. Thanks for the heads-up. Wonder if the 2A motors operate differently at 2A than the 2.8A spec motors which would be under-powered if they're a different design?

    I plan on having two machines, so as my budget improves, at least all 6 motors will be utilized and nothing goes to waste. TB6600 looks like a great recommendation, muchos gracias.

    I'm contemplating THK ballscrew actuators and steel gantry for the next build, and even thinking about ClearPath hybrid motors after reading the Neo7CNC pages. Ultimately, I want to have very very accurate capabilities for some performance auto parts I wish to make soon. Individual throttle body systems, reduced pullies (reason I bought a 4x board, rotory axis) and others.

    And all my electronics will be mounted in an enclosure under a steel tabletop. It's an empty server rack and everything should fit perfectly.
     
    #3 Andrew Helsel, Jul 9, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2017
  4. Julius

    Julius Veteran
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    IF the motors are both the same torque rating, the 2A will operate properly at 2A supply, while the 2.8A ones will be slightly underpowered because they are made with a higher inductance.
     
    #4 Julius, Jul 9, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2017
  5. stargeezer

    stargeezer Veteran
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    Hi Andrew. Nice build and thanks for the pics. Very nice work!

    Larry
     
  6. Andrew Helsel

    Andrew Helsel Well-Known
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    Thanks, it's a nice weekend project when pieces show up.
     
  7. Andrew Helsel

    Andrew Helsel Well-Known
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    Having trouble setting up RUN signal from pin 2.12 into the SuperPID still. config.txt file attached for anyone who may be able to assist... (there's a file called config_CNConly.txt but it's a draft and I wasn't able to delete that file)

    SuperPID instructions here say this:

    "RUN This is an input that controls the router ON - OFF. This is normally driven from a logic level signal where 0v = router RUN and 5v = router OFF. This input can also be driven from an open-drain (or pulldown) control like a switch to ground, or an open drain control wire (like an output from a G540)."

    So I tried 2.12o and 2.12v for open drain or pulldown, M3 does nothing. Maybe this command is not going to give me RUN?

    spindle_switch_on_pin 2.12v(or 2.12o)

    In fact, here's my mess - I just need help learning more of the firmware mechanics, what's unnecessary, etc:


    ## Spindle settings
    spindle_enable true
    spindle_pwm_pin 2.5
    spindle_pwm_period 50
    spindle_feedback_pin 2.6
    spindle_pulses_per_rev 1
    spindle_default_rpm 5000
    spindle_control_P 0.1
    spindle_control_I 0.1
    spindle_control_D 0.1
    spindle_control_smoothing 0.1
    spindle_switch_on_pin 2.12v
    spindle_max_rpm 30000
    spindle_min_rpm 0
     

    Attached Files:

  8. DaveStewart

    DaveStewart Well-Known
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    Very nice build Andrew. My electronics are almost complete but a tad unorganized. :(
    Your layout has given me some pointers and inspiration.
    Keep up the good work.
    Cheers, D.
     
    Andrew Helsel likes this.
  9. Lofton Harris

    Lofton Harris Well-Known
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    Andrew, if you haven't already I suggest you visit:
    Google Groups
    Someone there can probably assist. I'll be using a Smoothieboard on my build, but with a spindle and do not intend to use the board to control the spindle (even though it came with a PWM board). I'm impressed with your wiring; mine is much less elaborate. My Smoothie is mounted on the mini mill while the power supplies are separate. At some point I'll consolidate everything into one box.
     
    Andrew Helsel likes this.
  10. Andrew Helsel

    Andrew Helsel Well-Known
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    Yes, I wanted to be able to switch from GCode to manual PID control, hence the DPDT switch; the open loop switch might never be used but the option is cool. I keep adding panel sockets - ´┐╝like the Deutsche DT style auto connectors for the LED ring, E stop and 3-pin speed sensor. Just glad it works and no Sparks or blue smoke has flown.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. Lofton Harris

    Lofton Harris Well-Known
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    Brown smoke is the worst. To be avoided at all costs.
     
  12. cginca

    cginca New
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    Nice build; I was thinking of something similar. What kind of rapid speeds are you able to get?

    Are you happy with the smoothie control?
     
  13. Michael Dwyer

    Michael Dwyer Well-Known
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    Nice build, but something is just wrong when the electrical enclosure is larger than the machine itself. LOL, I'm a mechanical engineer!
     
  14. RuneK

    RuneK New
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    Not sure if you have solved Smoothie connection to VFD, but as my Super-pid is slowly moving towards my postbox I had some time reading som specs. I plan to connect super-pid to a smoothieboard.

    I belive your config for smoothie should be changed to the settings smoothie describes under Analog Spindle.

    Code:
    spindle.type                                     analog   # set the spindle type to analog, can also be used for ESC spindles controlled by a PWM
    spindle.max_rpm                                  30000    # set the max spindle speed that is achieved at 100% PWM
    spindle.pwm_pin                                  2.4      # the pin which emits the PWM signal
    spindle.pwm_period                               1000     # the PWM frequency
    spindle.switch_on_pin                            2.6      # the pin which is used to enable the VFD (optional)

    Just Remeber that Smoothie use 0-10v for speed reference signal. And from the instruction at Super-pid, they expect 0-5v. If you look in the Super-Pid Instructions they have a solution for the 0-5 vs 0-10v

    "Super-PID can accept a speed control voltage of 0v to 10v (or 0v to 12v) from a controller, but this needs to be reduced to 0v to 5v by using 2 resistors, as a simple voltage reducer."

    PWM Frequency is a bit unclear for me yet, and so for tacho reading back to smoothie, but I am continue to look for it.
     

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