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Is a .8kw spindle too big for a 750 x 1000 OX build?

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by Rodm, Jan 28, 2017.

  1. Rodm

    Rodm Veteran
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    Hi,
    Trying to decide what to use. First thought was a dewalt 611, then thought a makita rt0701. I liked that it went down to 10,000 rpm and still 1.25 hp.The speed control and lower noise levels of a spindle setup seems like a good idea. Routers I know, spindles I'm clueless. I saw 300w and 400w spindles packaged with the SMW3D kits but it seems to me they would not have the power needed for 1/4 aluminum or larger wood projects. I'm sure they wouldn't of chosen them if they weren't capable choices but...
     
  2. Darathy

    Darathy Journeyman
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    0.8kw probably wont be to big ,you can probably go even 1,5kw and dont make same mistake i did and buy 2.2kw before you know its too heavy hehe. The upside of spindles is they are insanely quiet compared to dewalt or any other router thats why i will go with spindle instead.
     
  3. Anthony Bolgar

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    I run a 1.5KW spindle on my OX, it is fine as long as power is going to the stepper, unpowered, the Z axis drops to the table.
     
  4. Rangatang

    Rangatang Well-Known
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    Any ways to prevent that? I'm looking at 2.2kW spindle and didn't even think about that!
     
  5. Anthony Bolgar

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    Change the pitch of the lead screw is one option
     
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  6. Darathy

    Darathy Journeyman
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    and normal nema 23 wont be able to lif the 2.2kw spindle so you gona have to go for high torque ones and mybe even change pitch on the leadscrew
     
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  7. Jestah

    Jestah Veteran
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    Anthony, when your next running some HEAVY cutting where your at the limit of your machines cutting ability would you mind having a look at the current draw and power readouts on your spindle VFD.

    I don't mean to be rude but am genuinely interested to see if my theory is correct that a 1.5kw spindle will still be at around half of its overall load capacity when the machine frame starts showing flex. My 800w water cooled spindle has some headroom when my ox frames are topping out so wondering what the 1.5 comes in at. Maybe I need to beef up my frame a bit?

    @Rodm I am a big fan of going for a lighter spindle and moving/accelerating it faster as a way to get the most out of the Vslot system. The 750mm wide span across the gantry is going to cope with the smaller weight of the 800w spindle as well as helping the Z axis avoid larger than needed cantilever loads. The only draw back I have found to the 800w is the 7mm max shaft size for tooling but this suits the faster lighter loaded cutting style I tend to run or tight nesting of parts.
     
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  8. Joe Santarsiero

    Joe Santarsiero OB addict
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    I use a .8 for the same reasons. Collet capacity was an initial concern during design, but hasn't been an issue after the build. You can find some larger tooling with smaller shank sizes if you dig. I just haven't found a need for any of them yet.
     
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  9. Rodm

    Rodm Veteran
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    Great info. Thanks to everyone involved. Glad to know the .8kw is a good choice and not oversized for an OX type build. Let's talk power supply. I see there are both 110v and 220v options. Both conditioning power to a 220v 3phase output, correct? Does a 110v unit limit the .8kw spindle or does that only come into play on more powerful spindles? Also I remember a comment about the "silent spindle" of a 2.2k vrs the 600w "jet engine"? Is there some kind of spec l need to know or look for to avoid the "jet engine "?
     
  10. Jestah

    Jestah Veteran
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    If you have a 220v line you can run it on the I would go the 220v option but I am from NZ so its what feels normal to us. I think both will give the same power output at the tool tho so no worries there.

    all of the spindle I have imported have been very quite but have never come across the jet engine issue. I do try and look for the 4 bearing version and try and get all the parts (pump, hose, vfd and spindle all from the same person to avoid any blame shifting)
     
  11. Joe Santarsiero

    Joe Santarsiero OB addict
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    The VFD will take house AC voltage and convert it to the three phase for the spindle.
    The higher voltage vfds draw less current at the breaker. If you are in the states then a 1hp 110V vfd will plug into a standard outlet and run a .8kw. If you have a 220 to your workspace then you should choose a 2hp 1.5kw vfd.

    Joe
     
  12. Rodm

    Rodm Veteran
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    Thanks Joe,
    It's hard not to like the idea of more power but for now I only have a small subpanel in my garage workshop. Dedicating two of the four positions for a 220 line isn't an option and it seems the .8 might do everything I'm hoping for. I believe the x beam of the ox is two 750 mm 20x60s if I wanted to stretch it to 1000mm would you recommend upping it to 20x80s or something else?
     
  13. Gary Caruso

    Gary Caruso Veteran
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    the Makita RT0701 is super quite when kept under 18k RPM, at 10-14k (setting 1~3) it's a whisper
     
  14. Joe Santarsiero

    Joe Santarsiero OB addict
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    I recommended the 2hp 220V because you can derate them for smaller motors, they draw less current, and you could upgrade to a 1.5kw later if you chose. A 110v 2hp vfd would draw around max 10A running a 1.5kw spindle vs around 5A of a similar 220v vfd. Divide those currents in half for a .8kw spindle.

    Joe
     
  15. Rodm

    Rodm Veteran
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    o_O ;):confused: it's both fun and frustrating learning and making decisions about a build for a newbie like me. Every new bit of info gets me rethinking. Believe it or not the weather has helped me make up my mind. I'm going to design and build this unit assuming I might end up with a 1.5kw spindle, in the house where it's warm, testing and running it with the Makita till it warms up and I decide about upgrading the electric to my workshop. Its good to know the figures on the 2hp vfd, thanks Joe. With that decided, do you think 2 80x20 rails for x is good? The makita is less than $100 and the trim router I use now has seen a lot of action. Would be replacing it soon anyway so no money wasted.
     
  16. Gary Caruso

    Gary Caruso Veteran
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    IMO the 2080 is the way to go, and the C-beam Z is so much stiffer than 2060 Z, and the 80mm width of the C-beam Z helps with spindle mounting options.. Chrisclub Ox HD plates
     
  17. Rodm

    Rodm Veteran
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    Chrisclub = Chris Laidlaw right? I've traded a few emails with him, very helpfull. Are you agreeing 2 20x80s are the way to go or suggesting the C-beam as a better - simpler option? I've considered the c chanel and like the idea of a single extrusion vrs connecting two. Thanks for your help and I'm really enjoying following your build.
     
  18. Gary Caruso

    Gary Caruso Veteran
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    Yes, that Chris. C-beam slightly less stiff than two 2080's if properly joined together. Just less material with C-beam.
    If bonding or bolting the two together sounds like too much then C beam is a viable option.
     
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  19. Rodm

    Rodm Veteran
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    No not to much but why if it's not necessary? Thanks
     

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