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Hybrid Stepper Motor Question

Discussion in 'Motors' started by Project Hopeless, Feb 9, 2019.

  1. Project Hopeless

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    So I'm looking at a 4 axis kit with hybrid stepper motors (8 wire). I haven't come across many of these in my searches, most kits were bipolar 4 wire. Any issues with these motors? Any down side?

    KL23H286-20-8B Stepper Motor

    This 425oz/in NEMA23 stepper motor is well suited to medium sized motion control projects of all types.
    • 425 oz In. Hybrid Motor
    • 1.8° /200 Steps Per Rev.
    • 2.8 Amps Current Per Phase ( Bipolar Parallel)
    • 8-wire Bi-polar or unipolar, NEMA 23 Frame
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Project Hopeless

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  3. cmitcham

    cmitcham Well-Known
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    can we keep this thread going for more info?

    I bought 4 of this same stepper for my workbee, and although they are running for me, I'm pretty sure I need some tuning for best performance. I wired them as parallel bipolar, and have 36v power supply. the spec sheet for the motor shows this:

    upload_2019-3-19_13-57-30.png

    does this mean 2.8 amps is as high as I can set the driver? my kl-5056 drivers have a setting for 2.7a, so I chose that. with the steppers powered and still, they are quite easy to turn by hand if I grab the coupler. I'm pretty sure I should not be able to turn them when powered. the drivers do have a half current setting with very confusing documentation, so I'm not sure what I have set.

    looks like I have a lot of play/trial unless someone can help.

    thanks!
    calvin.
     
  4. Peter Van Der Walt

    Peter Van Der Walt OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Resident Builder Project Maker Builder

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    Theres three key values to choosing steppers:


    Current rating (Maximum current draw: make sure you have drivers that can supply at least this much)
    Inductance (Higher inductance needs higher voltages. Our High Torque motors are 4mH, in Parallel wiring these are 6.8mH so would probably do better at 60v. Our 4mH ones have a recommended 24-48v. In Series wiring its a whopping 27.2mH - so more like 100vdc)
    Resistance (Or more importantly calculating coil voltage from resistance and amps if its not on the datasheet). Higher coil voltages need higher stepper driver voltages. You want a lot more voltage than the rated coil voltage so that a modern stepper driver can do its thing (Chopper current control with fast PWM voltage = need mugh higher input voltages for fast rise times to accurately produce the correct output for the motor).

    So basically, the motors you bought are high voltage motors. Getting them to work will be sooo hard, I'd personally just get more suitable motors.
     
  5. cmitcham

    cmitcham Well-Known
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    well that's bad news, but thanks for saving me hassle. i did email the vendor asking about the motor/driver/ps i was looking at, and he said that would be a great package. maybe he wont be my favorite supplier from now on :)

    can i bother you to check this stepper?

    Dual Shaft Nema 23 Uni/Bipolar 1.8deg 2.83Nm (400 oz.in) 4A 57x84mm 8 Wires

    my drivers max out at 5.6a, so i see that is just at the bipolar parallel motor spec, not higher as you have already suggested.

    while i wait for new steppers, i have work to do adjusting eccentrics :) but i'm also still playing with the steppers i have, just sitting on the bench. so the following is not arguing, it is learning. with my 36v, this stepper does run. neither the stepper or driver ever get (noticeably) higher than room temperature, so i have sneaked the current setting on the driver up to 3.8a, and still, they don't heat up at all. should they? would trying higher current hurt if nothing is hot yet at all? and still, the shaft is pretty easy to spin by hand while the motor is powered but not moving. it should be hard to turn, right?

    thanks again.
     

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