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Any one up for making an OX "on a stick" ?

Discussion in 'General Talk' started by Serge E., Dec 13, 2016.

  1. Serge E.

    Serge E. Master
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    Well, here's an interesting transformation gone commercial. What looks too much like a planer body is being used to make a narrow CNC router with the ability to work 12+' long pieces ... while keeping foot print of a planer ! It's the Phlatprinter idea with a twist. The CarveWright CX :



    They even have a rotary adaptor. Looks interesting. Auto correct slips (!), etc. How precise can it be with just about any material ? It's all in the way the gCode is generated. Multiple passes on one axis, stepping other to move the material through once full depth is done on current line.

    I have been thinking of something similar for a while now. Of course, doing it much wider than 14" or so. The problem I was restling with was how to move the work piece back and forth under the router without getting an alignment situation ? Simple : just feed the material in one direction, doh ! The gCode needs to be generated for this to happen. It basically becomes a software issue at that point.

    Any one up for making an OX "on a stick" ?
     
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  2. David the swarfer

    David the swarfer OpenBuilds Team
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    how about using the workpiece as the Y axis?
    so if the base is made as a triangle, drive 2 wheels on a flat edge, and spring load a wheel on the other side (which does not have to be perfectly straight).
    onastick.png
     
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  3. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
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    First thought from the title of this thread was "just where exactly do you plan to put that stick that won't make the ox mad..."?

    But seriously, this would actually be a fairly economical way to put together a system. Checking Amazon, cheap planers can be had for around $240 which in a typical piece built system wouldn't even cover the cost of the frame and the wheels. Just set up your X and Z axes as close as you can to the outbound side of the rollers and let her rip. And if you could potentially achieve sufficient grip and pull with one set of rollers, you might even be able eliminate the outbound set which would help in getting all the pieces to fit within the enclosure. As far as the software goes, isn't this how contouring software works? (I haven't used any so I really don't know.)
     
  4. Serge E.

    Serge E. Master
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    You mean have the 'OX' ride the edge instead of pulling the workpiece through ?

    It certainly would make sense to work large / heavy pieces which have at least one true edge and the other relatively parallel ... within spring loaded wheel's capacity to compensate any variations. The force needed would be consistent no matter the size of the workpiece since the tool would be moving (constant weight).

    Could have a set of wheels on either side of gantry to ride the surfaces of the workpiece. Top wheel fixed to keep working side parallel withi tool end, bottom wheels spring loaeded to allow enough friction to hold work piece and ride it along with side wheels ...

    The drive wheels could be somewhat spiked to bite just enough into the workpiece .. They are not making contact with areas of the workpiece being kept once work is done. Regardless, workpiece will need to have minimal thickness - the width of wheels riding the edge ....

    Interesting...
     
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