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Advice for heavy duty motorised video equipment

Discussion in 'Concepts and Ideas' started by Max Bridge, Jun 25, 2020.

  1. Max Bridge

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    I'm trying to build some motorised tools for video production using professional video cameras, RED camera etc. think 5-10kg in weight. Everything has to be really precise with little to no wobble or backlash.

    I've been looking into this for a while and would love some advice on a few points. FYI, I have looked through all the forum posts but there's nothing that answers my questions.

    I'd like the rig to be able to move vertically and even inverted if possible, although inverted is less important. I was originally looking at the 500mm Openbuilds linear actuator - C-Beam® XLarge Linear Actuator Bundle - I then had a chat with someone at Igus who said using a screw could cause a wobbling movement and that a belt driven system would be much better. Screw would definitely provide more torque but it's useless to me if there is any wobble.

    1) Could there be wobble on the Openbuilds linear actuator if the slider is only 500mm long? I can understand the wobble being an issue with longer sliders but I'd hope it wouldn't be a problem on shorter units.

    2) Would the Openbuilds system be safe running vertically and even inverted? I was thinking of using some extra wheels on the inside to help with stability. This is very important as camera equipment is stupidly expensive and my worst nightmare would be for the carriage to come off the slider in either a vertical or inverted setup.

    The guy at Igus suggested the Toothed belt axis size 1040 with a Nema 23 XL which will give better torque. I want to get the right thing but that will be quite costly.


    drylin® E electric linear axes and linear drives with motor

    What does everyone think? Igus or Openbuilds for the slider?

    Next, I'd like to build a rotation device but I'll start a new thread for that so things don't get confused.

    Any help would be much appreciated!
     
  2. David the swarfer

    David the swarfer OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Builder Resident Builder

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    I agree with belt but a good ballscrew would not wobble. for 10kg I would not use ordinary ACME leadscrew (-:
    Use the smallest pulley you can or use a reduction system. (ie small pulley driving big pulley which has the belt drive pulley on the same shaft )
    This will give you more torque and smoother movement without having to use very high microstepping which would reduce the torque available.

    rubber mount the stepper motor to shield the rail from vibrations.
     
  3. Max Bridge

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    So would using a ball screw like the ones below be ok?

    https://uk.rs-online.com/web/c/pneu...screws-lead-screws/ball-screws-screws-shafts/

    Would that be better than using a belt?

    One other question, would that be easy to incorporate into the OpenBuilds system I mentioned?

    Sorry but not sure exactly what you mean with the pulley. Do you mean a counterweight? I'm very new to all this so apologies for my ignorance.
     
  4. David the swarfer

    David the swarfer OpenBuilds Team
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    that sort of thing. 'better' depends a lot on the application.
    search these forums for examples of how people have fitted ballscrews to their machines.
    a small pulley driving the belt gives higher resolution. in your case this means less vibration.

    I think you should buy a belt drive and a screw drive motion kit and play with them, best way to learn (-:
    in the UK... Linear Actuator Kits | Stepper Motor Driven | Ships From The UK
     

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