Welcome to Our Community

Some features disabled for guests. Register Today.

7050 Sphinx

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by Michael.M, Jul 15, 2017.

  1. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
    That was a pretty good cut you made there. Good proof that the spindle is strong and able to handle heavy duty cuts...but do not do that all the time.

    I would have had the RPM at 10000 RPM or higher and started off at about 30 mm per minute if that depth of cut and stepover was intentional. But in reality i would have set my DOC at 2 or 3mm and stepover at 2mm.
     
    #241 Sprags, Jan 21, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2018
  2. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    I was reading some forum posts recently and the more experienced machinist were stating that when it comes to carbide bits and coolant, you either run no coolant at all or you run it 100% of the time. They say this because the carbide cannot handle the quick temp changes that a small blast of coolant would cause and the endmill could potentially shatter.
     
  3. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    Printed it with PETG. It's probably one of the strongest filaments I have. DSCN1528.JPG
     
  4. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
    It depends...if you are taking small DOC and small stepovers it helps to heat up up the carbide....but that is only if you are not cutting for long periods of time. I know from first hand experience...

    But overall to be on the safe side I would use coolant with carbide.

    The secret to better machining is to use high speed machining techniques if possible. Small DOC and small stepovers is just a simple HSM technique. Constant Surface Contact surface machining is where its at. That basically means that the tool never moves away from part in the toolpath. The constant contact allows the tool to stay heated up and that helps with cutting better. Trochoidal toolpaths are one way of staying on the part at all time. There are other toolpath types but that one is the one talked about the most.. But that takes some practice to create good toolpaths and unless you have CAM software that outputs HSM toolpaths then its tough to create by manual G-Code programming. And just because the software says it can create Trochoidal toolpaths there should be settings to adjust the toolpath to optimize if for Trochoidal machining.
     
  5. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
    As far as the tap guide goes...thank you.

    So considering that I'm new at building stuff with the OpenBuilds components it took me some time to understand the assembly process to perform. Once I got in the routine after practicing with the first y-axis plate I got the second one finished in 45 minutes or so.

    All I have Frog Lube which I use for cleaning and lubing my firearms between a complete tear down/reassembly. Works good.

    So I have both y-axis plates built and when and I'm dialing in how freely they roll on the c-beam without having any slop or backlash. The two things that control that adjustability are the eccentric spacers and how freely the bearings spin. The two are close but not exactly the same.
     
    #245 Sprags, Jan 21, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2018
  6. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
    Upon reviewing the build guide for a Sphinx build I found that it calls out for 27mm screws which aren't available at OpenBuilds and thanks to Michael M. suggesting as an alternative to use a 3mm spacer between the screw head and mounting plate the need to grind down a bunch of 30mm screws isn't necessary. Unfortunately my supply of 3mm spacers is limited. My build is on hold pending a delay in shipping
     
  7. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
    I am assembling the X-axis gantry plate/wheel assembly and I used the build guide along with the solidworks model to see how it's built. I have the eccentric spacers oriented so it should roll in as loosely as possible yet it will not roll on like it should. I'm thinking I should remove the inner wheels and see if it will roll onto the c- beam that way,
     
  8. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    Well if you take some pictures of your wheel arrangements I could probably help you figure it out.
     
  9. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    I would double check your eccentric spacers. I know you said you opened them up but this is the only thing I can think of
     
  10. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
    After posting I decided to remove the fixed row of wheels and i then oriented the eccentric spacers so they were both in the same direction with the wheels having the most distance from the V-slots. I probably had the spacers oriented the other way. With everything assembled it was kind of hard to see which way the e-spacers were oriented. That plus I couldn't sleep even though I was tired so that didn't help either.
     
  11. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    If you look closely, the eccentric spacers have a small "6mm" label you can use for orientation
     
  12. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
    I saw that...but just to make it easier for me to see I have been marking the flat with the '6mm' label with a Sharpie Marker as well. Thank you.

    PS just wait until I start asking you questions about setting up the spindle and VFD with the controller card. I started reading through the manual for the VFD and not only is electronics a foreign language to me but so is chinese english. :)
     
  13. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
    Assembling the X-axis wheel/plate assemblies I found that the 60mm screws that are specified are too short for the way the Blue Ox plates are currently machined. The counterbored holes should be deeper rather than just deep enough to make it so the screw head is flush with the plate surface.
    And the opposite plate should also have counterbored holes for both rows of holes.

    This is so the screws stuck out far enough so the locknuts can be threaded on completely.

    I am going to see if I can get longer screws at the hardware store...unless of course there is another solution that I'm just not seeing right now.
     
  14. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    DSCN1582.JPG I didn't have any problems using the recommended hardware from the original build guide that I can remember. It's been a while but I know I didn't have to source any other bolts besides the 10mm M5 because at the time, OpenBuilds was out of stock. Make sure you have the installed the correct spacers. As you can see there was just barely enough thread. I haven't had any issues with these.
     
    #254 Michael.M, Feb 3, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2018
  15. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
    On the side of the plate where the eccentric spacers go I feel its necessary to use a spacer/shim/washer because the hole is large and the locknut does not contact the plate completely. I now see that 65mm screws are available from Openbuilds and that is the length that will do the trick. I am still waiting for the Phoenix CNC board so I am considering getting the CNC xPro V3 also.
     
  16. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    Well considering that you still have a fair amount of building left to do before you actually need the controller, I'd just wait. The Phoenix is a very well made board and I can only help you interface the VFD with that board as others have different schematics.
     
  17. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    The only reason I say this is because both boards will essentially do the same thing but im not sure of the driver orientation. I see one version of the board has built in drivers. So can you use the individual dq542ma drivers also?
     
  18. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    It does appear to have some interesting features though.

    I'm tying up some loose ends right now. DSCN1578.JPG DSCN1579.JPG DSCN1577.JPG
     
  19. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
    I will wait. The sale only cuts the price by about $14 so if I need to I can get it later. I found another web site that sells it for $119 normally so if I need to I will possibly get it from there. I will get the 65mm screws though.
     
  20. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
  21. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    Oh these are hall effect limit switches. They can be sealed up and basically become a worry free, non mechanical end stop.
     
  22. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    They have an LED status light to let you know when the switch has been triggered (by a strong magnet). I just need to figure out the perfect magnet bracket now. You have to make sure the magnet is facing the right way also.
     
  23. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    I will add links in my parts list for the sensors and breakout board.
     
  24. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
    I did get the micros witch limit switches...but the solution is simple...just don't let machine travel past its limits.
     
  25. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    This is not just for limits. This is also for homing of the machine which must me done consistently, every day. The micro switch arms fail over time. I've personally broke a few of them. It will be very nice when I don't have to worry about them anymore.
     
  26. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
    Can you tell me what you used of the machine controller enclosure? An old

    In the real world when you home ( G28 ) a machine you actually should never actually go to the 0.,0.,0. never go to the machine coordinate.

    Most programs I write for a vertical mill have code (in inches) that looks like this:

    G0 G90 G28 Z-.1
    X-.1 Y-.1
    M30

    Which brings the machine to .1 inches below machine 0. then jogs the machine to machine X-.1 and Y-.1 next. You never want to put X, Y and Z all on the same line since there is a chance something could be in the way if it rapids directly to machine home. On industrial machines if the spindle is at machine 0.,0.,0. there is a chance because of inaccuracies of the machine that that location could actually exceed the machine limits.

    .10 inches is equal (roughly) to .25 mm so if you are programming in metric i would use .25 mm for the distance from G28 machine home.

    If machine rapid scares you you can always use a G1 instead of G0 and then use a relatively fast feed rate such as F25. a feed of 25 is pretty fast but not so fast that if it looks close you wont be able to turn the feed rate down or at the worst case hit the E=Stop button.

    Also its a good idea to make sure you always use a decimal point when programming co-ordinates
     
  27. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    Most of these machines your thinking of utilize rotary encoders and closed loop steppers or servos. These hobby machines operate in relation to home point and negative coordinate.
     
  28. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
    For instance, you loose power to your steppers for whatever reason and the controller would not be aware of this.
     
  29. Sprags

    Sprags Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    13
    I haven't seen a hobby machine in action before so I guess that's something i need to learn.
     
  30. Michael.M

    Michael.M Journeyman
    Staff Member Builder Resident Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    233
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice