Welcome to Our Community

Some features disabled for guests. Register Today.

4x8 Build Requesting Input

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by rebel102285, Aug 28, 2018.

  1. rebel102285

    rebel102285 Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    I am looking to build a machine that i can load full 4x8 sheets in to and have been researching for some time but would like some input before i pull the trigger. Right now i am considering going to www.joescnc.com and build one similar to



    Compared to the one in the Video that Rick's CNC did i would more than likely go with nema 23 instead of 34. I have been considering going with the plug and play kit from CNC Router Parts but not sure if that would be the best option Plug and Play NEMA 23 CNC Control System - CRP800-00E-5 | CNCRouterParts

    I am open to input and the only thing i wouldnt change is that i do want to have the capability to load full 4x8 sheets. I do have experience with 3d Printing so i'm not a complete and total noob but havent built my own from scratch before.
     
    JACK MYRICK likes this.
  2. Kevon Ritter

    Kevon Ritter Master
    Builder

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2015
    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    101
    That guy got ripped apart in the comments. He probably spent double what he needed to for what he got.

    That aside...the most difficult part at this scale is your motion drive. Many opt for belts as it's waaaaay cheaper than screws or rack and pinion.

    Since you want s full 4x8, it's safe to assume that you will be routing plywood, mdf, particle board (with and without laminate), and plastic/foam. That's not a heavy load, but if you plan to use it often, it won't be a bad idea to get a spindle over a router just for durability.

    The next consideration is...more linear motion stuff. Here at OB, the common solution is using v-wheels. It's easy and cheap...on a smaller machine. It can add up where you want more. The next option would be supported linear rods. Then you have linear rails. The load copacity goes up, as well as the difficulty to install as you go up that list. AVOID unsupported rods!

    The electrical side isn't difficult at all if you have any electrical knowledge. By that, red is positive, black is ground, and connect the same marked ports. If you go this direction, you'll save 75% over the kit.
     
  3. rebel102285

    rebel102285 Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks for the input! My plan right now is to go with the lowrider - then if I find myself using it as much as I'd hope I'll plan to upgrade down the road.
     
  4. Gary Caruso

    Gary Caruso OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

    Joined:
    May 19, 2016
    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    198
    Hi Rebel,
    The lowrider uses nema 17, you would have to "upgrade" every part to get something you will be happy with IMO.
    Impressive engineering, but limited in performance.
    Cheers
    Gary
     
  5. rebel102285

    rebel102285 Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    What would you suggest instead?
     
  6. Gary Caruso

    Gary Caruso OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

    Joined:
    May 19, 2016
    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    198
    Personally, I would build something like the cnc router parts machine.
    You need more than a 4080 or c-beam for 48" gantry travel, things get real flexible when that long.
    There have been a couple big builds on openbuilds, they work, but the depth of cut possible suffers.
    Belts can be done if dual belted.. the best video explaining dual belt.
    It's much more cost effective to do a smaller machine like a 1/4 sheet (32" X by 50" Y, 1000 x 1500mm machine)
    Gary
     
  7. Kevon Ritter

    Kevon Ritter Master
    Builder

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2015
    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    101
    I'll second the 1/4 sheet size. It's more than just a money/time investment. It's also a space investment, which is a much greater factor than many realize.
     
  8. ChadRat6458

    ChadRat6458 Journeyman
    Builder

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2014
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    23
    I am about to finish up a 1m x 1m sphinx. I would like a big machine that can do 4' x 8' sheets. When I am ready for that, I think I will go with cncrouter parts pro setup. Mainly because everything is figured out for you. I would do my own electronics. I think their package is way over priced. I also prefer linuxcnc over mach 3.
     
    Gary Caruso likes this.
  9. Andreas Bockert

    Andreas Bockert Veteran
    Builder

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2017
    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    36
    Do you have a specific use in mind for 4x8 or is it “just in case”?

    If you’re a hobbyist like me then you’ll likely be routing stuff less than 1x1 foot most of the time.

    While I have a lead screw machine (sphinx) I believe that a belt or a rack and pinion machine would be more economical to upsize down the line.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice