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2D Scanning?

Discussion in '3D Scanners' started by flysolo206, Mar 21, 2018.

  1. flysolo206

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    Hello 3D scanner folks!

    I'm looking for feedback on a seemingly simple concept. I'm a noob, and the 3D scanning discussion seems to be the best fit so I apologize if this is off topic....

    I want to build a simple scanner that scans the side (profile) of a cylindrical/symmetrical object. The object can be anything that can be turned on a lathe.

    My approach is to use ToF sensor mounted on a carriage that is traveling (on a single axis) parallel to the object. I would record sensor outputs (distance from sensor to object) every mm or so and then render the output data as a graphical file somehow (SVG or DXF maybe?) that can by used by CAM software.

    The basic idea:
    SCAN the profile of an object > RENDER a CAM friendly file > then TURN it on a CNC lathe.

    Any feedback on any of the following questions would be really helpful. Thanks ahead of time.
    1. What kind of software would work well?
    2. Anyone have any luck using (nearly) raw data to create a graphical rendering in SVG format?
    3. Would this be considered 1D, or 2D scanning? (just curious)
    4. Any feedback on the general concept?
    Appreciate it,
    AP
     
  2. Buj

    Buj New
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    if i understand you right, inkscape. It is free and does exactly what you are asking.
     
  3. Scotty Orr

    Scotty Orr Master
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    If the object is not too big, you could just scan it with an office copier/scanner. Save as JPG and use inkscape to create an SVG from the silhouette.
    This would be 2D scanning. If you do as you suggest, "measuring distance from object to sensor", that's going to be 3D scanning.
     
  4. JustinTime

    JustinTime Master
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    To get a 2D 'scan' what I do is take a piece of paper with a very bold line on it and mark it with a cross line every inch. I do it for a length of 6". I put it next to the object I want to 'scan' and take a picture of it, trying to be as perfectly 90┬░ above it as possible. I then import the picture (jpg in most cases) into my preferred CAD program, SketchUp in my case, and scale the picture using the 6" line as measurement. I now can trace the object and have a model of it in the CAD program.
     
  5. flysolo206

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    Thanks Scotty - The objects can be big (like table legs). I'm experimenting with this to potentially make it part of a production process.
     
  6. flysolo206

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    Thanks Buj - Ill take a closer look at Inkscape
     
  7. flysolo206

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    Hmmm ok. That would be a great workaround if I can't get this machine up and running.
     
  8. ExWhyZee

    ExWhyZee Well-Known
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    Another Approach i thought of would be to make yourself a wall mounted or free standing White LED Light Box with a White Perspex Front & Calibrated Reference Lines on it. This should be O.K for Larger Items

    Place The Object to be scanned in front of the Box & Take a Photo of the silhouette in a darkened room.

    This would make the job of Raster to Vector Conversion much more Reliable without lots of Software Tinkering & Tweaking.

    Try to get the perspex as defused & illuminated as evenly as possible & Take Photo from a Distance Away.

    Lightbox1.png Lightbox 2.png
     
    Giarc likes this.

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