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OX CNC Router

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by Chefson, Feb 5, 2017.

  1. Chefson

    Chefson Well-Known
    Builder

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    Chefson published a new build:

    Read more about this build...
     
  2. Jamie Charleston

    Jamie Charleston Well-Known
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    Hello,
    Where did you find the stl files? I am looking for those myself. Thank you.
     
  3. snokid

    snokid Master
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

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  4. Chefson

    Chefson Well-Known
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    Thanks for the answer snokid. this is where I found them.
     
  5. Jamie Charleston

    Jamie Charleston Well-Known
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    thanks, they are helping me with my prototyping my hybrid system. I have 9 ft y axis beams.
     
  6. TonyTheToolGuy

    TonyTheToolGuy Well-Known
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    As a mechanical engineer, I highly recommend that you attach some open build extrusions or something similar to the exterior of your vertical plates to stiffen them.
    Even your 5mm side plates will flex notably, and since you already have your Y-stepper hanging off the side of the plate, its clearance requirements afford you significant useable width to play with. YOU SHOULD USE IT, all the width you can.
    The side plates could be "boxed" to maximize their stiffness/weight, but just bolting on a vertical extrusion to the exterior surface as in the photo below would do wonders in limiting X-deflection and vibrations. Placing some acrylic double stick tape between the side plates and the surfaces of the extrusions/beams/"angle irons"/"whatever you use" along with some hard fasteners (bolts) would be very effective at transferring the stiffening forces.

    If you put two verticals like the one in the photo (they don't need to be parallel) and then put some sheet material multiply attached to the outside of those, you would have a boxed vertical side plate with extreme stiffness for its mass. You could think of it as a torsion box, and it would transfer all of the X-axis's motion more effectively into the base of your side rails and your table. Right now, your side plates will act sort of like spring levers due to their thinness which makes them lack flexural rigidity.

    The engineering concept behind the stiffness of things comes from what is called the area moment of inertia and it is a cubed function, so if a stiffening member is located twice as far and is still connected by some material like the thin section of an I-beam to transfer some shear stress, then the stiffness is 2 cubed, or 8 times. Three times the distance equals 27 times the stiffness, 3x3x3. This is why I-beams, bicycle tubes, airplane wings, empty Coke cans, and foam cored sheet laminated panels are so amazingly stiff for their mass.
     
    dvma likes this.

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