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Router Selection for my CNC

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by Sam Krohlow, Nov 28, 2019.

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  1. Sam Krohlow

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    I have a couple router options for my CNC, but I want opinions on what people think would be best.

    I am currently planning on using an M18 Milwaukee Trim Router for my CNC. I think running it with a 12.0 Ah battery will be plenty for my jobs, so I think that would be enough for any of my jobs. (4'x2' bed)
    M18 FUEL Compact Cordless Trim Router | Milwaukee Tool

    I also have an AC 1-3/4 HP Milwaukee Router that I can use, but I'm worried about it being too heavy. Being corded is a plus.
    1-3/4 Max HP BodyGrip® Router

    Another option would be to get a spindle and try to run it off my power supply (20A, with 4 Nema 23's), but not sure my power supply would be enough for it, or if it's even worth it.

    Any thoughts? Thanks.
    Sam
     
  2. Wallied

    Wallied New
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    First, the problem with the cordless ones is the twofold issue of having to keep a watch on the machine in case of the battery running out mid-job, and the fact that depending on the router you might not get a warning before the battery gets empty, possibly stopping mid-cut. Yikes.

    The corded Milwaukee will work depending on it's weight and if the plunge base can be removed, both things I didn't find on a quick skim through the link you posted. The commonly given recommendation is to stay under 3 kg, or about 6 pounds.

    And running a spindle from the same power supply you use for the steppers sounds like a bad idea (to me, some like doing this). Most importantly, the Chinese "spindles" this usually means are nothing more than dc-motors with an ER system mounted to the shaft, no suitable bearings, and usually a fair bit of runout. The bigger spindles, on the other hand, are driven by a mains-connected VFD, which can't be supplied by your power supply.

    Long story short, you can use any router or spindle, as long as it doesn't weigh a ton, and you have the means to mount it on your machine.

    Regards, Will
     
    Peter Van Der Walt likes this.
  3. Sam Krohlow

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    The corded Milwaukee Router easily removes from the base, so that's a non-issue. I'll have to check the weight, though. You're right and it might be too heavy.

    I also worry about the battery life of using the trim router, and would definitely need direct monitoring to make sure it could last the duration of a cut. Time will tell.

    Ok, one of my current routers seems like a better option than pursuing a spindle, so I'll eliminate that option.

    Thanks,
    Sam
     
  4. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Resident Builder Builder

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    Which CNC system are you mounting this on?
     
  5. phil from seattle

    phil from seattle Well-Known
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    Personally, I wouldn't use a battery powered router for this. What's the run time of the battery under constant load? Can't believe it's that long. I think you'll find that you have pretty long run times for anything that isn't super simple. Seems like a square peg in a round hole. Why add more complications?

    Frankly, if I was doing it again, I wouldn't bother with a router at all (I have a DW611 on my CBeam) and would go straight to a spindle. The big advantage is that you get significantly more control over router speed and you can control it from your GCode so it's always right for the specific material you are using. I think feeds and speeds are really misunderstood by beginners. I know I didn't get it at first. My DW611's lowest speed is 16K and that's well higher than a lot of material calls for.
     
  6. Giarc

    Giarc Master
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    If you need lower rpms, get a Makita. Mine goes down to 10,000 rpms which is why I chose it and it is fairly quiet. I love mine. You would need to source a 65 mm spindle mount but they are easy to come by. They are currently $99 at Amazon which means they are also probably on sale at your local big box home improvement store. I have considered going to a spindle myself, but judging by the threads here on OB forum, they can be a pain to set up.
     
  7. phil from seattle

    phil from seattle Well-Known
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    Thanks. Probably not going to put anything more into my CBeam machine. I'll be moving up to something better.
     

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