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Efficient CNC "dust collector" ...

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by evalon, Apr 22, 2019.

  1. evalon

    evalon Well-Known
    Builder

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    Hi all,

    First - I don't know if this is the right sub-forum to place this thread - please feel welcome to move it if it is better suited to another sub-forum.

    ... As it is I recently completed my CNC router build and in this context late in the process decided to make a "dust collector" that uses my vacuum cleaner to remove what is cut free during the milling. This "dust collector" has proved to be indeed very efficient - I would say that it removes ~ 99% of the cutter shavings (hope that is the right word) - and so I reckon it might be of use to others.

    It is basically made from a 3D printed PLA structure and then additionally a bit of plastic hose, a couple of short steel rods, some "window isolation brushes", a couple of bolts and nuts, two very small pieces of 1.5mm thick iron/steel, a bit of epoxy, and a bit of surplus glass. Using glass instead of a plastic of some kind prevents the glass from getting scratched by the cutter shavings (unless, I suppose, one is milling stone or something like that). And it makes it possible to look at what is happening in the milling process - unlike many other dust collectors I've seen e.g. on ebay.

    FYI I have attached a couple of pictures showing what it looks like. The vacuum cleaner "tube inlet" cylinder can be slid up and down so as to adjust to different end mill etc. lengths. On top of the glass section I use different 3D printed "lids" with different size holes so as to fit different milling motor nuts (ER20 in my case) & - again - end mills etc. When in need of changing the currently used end mill, the two "wing nuts" on the vacuum cleaner tube inlet cylinder, and a couple of short M3 nuts, can be loosened and the whole structure rotated away from the spindle so as to make room for replacing the end mill used. It works very well I think.

    I don't know if it fits the machines you mainly make/use here but should anyone be interested I can post the 3D model files used for the 3D prints.

    Cheers,

    Jesper
    IMG_20190421_155228.jpg IMG_20190421_155234.jpg IMG_20190421_155244.jpg
     
  2. GrayUK

    GrayUK Openbuilds Team Elder
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

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    This looks interesting. :rolleyes: A few more pictures and maybe a video of it in action would be good if possible? :D
    Maybe a copy of this into the Projects Section could be useful. :)
    Good Job :thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
  3. evalon

    evalon Well-Known
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    Hi GrayUK,

    Thanks for your comments ;) ... I don't have time to do a video but I have taken a couple more pictures that show how it works in practice (swinging the exhaust back in place, mounting the glass, mounting two M3 nuts, tightening the wing nuts). All in all it takes about 30 secs to get it all in place.

    I hope this makes it clearer - and, again, should anyone be interested in making a 3D print I can post the 3D model files.

    Cheers,

    Jesper
     

    Attached Files:

    GrayUK likes this.

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