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Ooznest Ox with 3D Printed Gantry Plates

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by IndyMaker, Feb 4, 2017.

  1. IndyMaker

    IndyMaker Well-Known
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    IndyMaker published a new build:

    Read more about this build...
     
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  2. rballsplat

    rballsplat Well-Known
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    Very nice. I sure would like to hear a follow up to find out if you feel it's sturdy enough.
     
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  3. Ryan Lock

    Ryan Lock Master
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    Nice build, will look forward to seeing the cutting performance.
     
  4. stargeezer

    stargeezer Veteran
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    Very nice. How are you keeping the adjustment eccentrics from rotating in the holes? Or has that proven to be any problem?

    The reason I asked is that I have tried plywood for the plates and the eccentric kept loosening from the vibration of operation. If this isn't a problem with ABS, you just might have broken some less traveled road.

    Please keep us up to date as you test, far more than just a couple people are watching this thread.

    Larry
     
  5. MULAWI

    MULAWI New
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    mabye PETG will better works... is very very strong.... stronger then ABS
     
  6. IndyMaker

    IndyMaker Well-Known
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    Appreciate all the support and interest. I've finished up the mechanical build and am hoping to get the electronics commissioned and start testing this weekend. I will watch for this as I move forward. I had not thought too much about this failure mode, I have been more focused on the overall ridigity of the ABS parts. On initial inspection after assembly, I am very happy with the y-plates; very sturdy. X-axis is smooth and seems stable, but I'm going to go back and adjust the z-axis wheels. It is the only axis I can detect slop (lateral) in when pushing and twisting on the axis. I have to try pretty hard to get it to twist, but I can detect it and I'm not happy enough with it to justify leaving it without trying to adjust it out. With this being my first CNC, I don't have any reference to "normal" play or how much lateral force the Z-axis experiences when machining.

    The nice thing about printing the plates is the perimeter of material that gets created at the edges and each through hole. In essence, it creates a solid column, which allows me to really crank down the nuts on each wheel bolt without worrying about crushing the part, and I'm hoping will help keep enough force on the eccentrics to keep them from spinning.

    I am designing/printing a z-axis marker tool holder for initial testing, as I am much more comfortable in the hardware world than the controls system any this point. Hoping to be drawing computer generated smiley faces within the week, and then will switch to my Dewalt 611 router on wood. Goal is to eventuall get to aluminum, and then self-upgrade any plates that need it.
     
  7. IndyMaker

    IndyMaker Well-Known
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    I've added the cable chains and put on the temporary "beginner" tool, my sharpie mount.

    The power supply is ready to go, I just need to get all the stepper wires extended and then I'll be ready to start moving.

    Also, here is the pro board with two 40mm fans on the updated fan mount. Happy to confirm that the stepper terminals are unobstructed by the larger fans.

    STL files for both are attached to the build, as well as a 60mm right angle mount designed for the v-rail in case they're useful for anyone else.
     
  8. crazerico

    crazerico Well-Known
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  9. IndyMaker

    IndyMaker Well-Known
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    And we're up and running. I grabbed a line art image off the web, converted it to a monochrome bitmap, and used F-Engrave to create my tool path. Exported the G-Code and here's the result.

    After a few more experiments with tool zeroing, will be ready to switch to the router. I will likely start with a v-bit using F-Engrave, as it's the workflow I'm most comfortable with at this point. I'll post again once I start cutting to document the overall performance with the ABS printed plates.
     
  10. MULAWI

    MULAWI New
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    i am still wondering how accurate this will be:) i'm very excited...
     
  11. Brian Popp

    Brian Popp Veteran
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    Very cool. I am currently in the process of doing almost exactly the same thing. I even picked the same build to model my design on. I was thinking about doubling up on all the plates (6mm). Do you think this is necessary? I printed a sample plate @ 3mm with ABS and it felt too flexible. I'm also planning to use polycarbonate, which is a little stronger than ABS (but may not hold up as well to vibration?). Like you, I really just want to keep it running long enough to be able to cut my own aluminum replacements. I'm also going to print my own V wheels in polycarbonate, so it will be interesting to see how that works out. I did one in TPU last night as a test and it seems solid.
     
  12. IndyMaker

    IndyMaker Well-Known
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    I've been travelling out of country for past couple weeks and feel delinquent so wanted to provide a quick update. I've had success running through several v-carves of text and images on some hardwood boards. I've even attempted a couple oak/walnut inlays with moderate success. The only issue I'm having is with the depth consistency, and I believe it is more due to an un-level table than the capability of the ABS/machine. I ran a small inlay (3" x 3") of a graphic isolated to one corner of the bed that is "mostly" level, and both pieces fit together very nicely, with no gaps. When I ran a bigger text run that utilized more table real estate, parts of the inverted inlay portion were cut too shallow as a result of the sloping table the depth, which translated to poorly fitting v-carve inlay with gaps.

    I got so excited to start cutting that I didn't put the time I should have into properly leveling the table. I know better from my 3D printing experience, as I can detect 1-2mm height issues as I move the tool around the table to different locations. I'm going to work on leveling the table this weekend, but am very optimistic with the potential.

    In response to the strength of the ABS printed parts and the overall accuracy of the machine, I'm pretty happy and think this will satisfy the initial requirement to get me cutting aluminum. If I were to do it again, I would go ahead and double up all the 3mm parts to 6mm in ABS just to make them a little stronger. I also have replaced the top and bottom of the Z tower with the aluminum Openbuilds threaded rod plates. I was placing an order for limit switches and decided to go ahead and add those to the cart while I was ordering because they were the components I saw the most flex in when running. The 3mm ABS plate guiding the threaded rod, along with supporting the NEMA 23 Stepper was having a rough time.

    Should be able to get things ironed out and add some more pictures of the current build as well as some example cuts this weekend.
     
    Ryan Lock likes this.
  13. Jim Day

    Jim Day New
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    How can I get the stl files so I may also try this build. Thanks for the build.
     
  14. IndyMaker

    IndyMaker Well-Known
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    I attached a couple unique STL parts I created for this build like the 40mm fan mount on the build page. All of the other parts are in this build are based off the original Ooznest Ox build by Ryan Lock here: Ooznest OX CNC Machine

    In that thread, there are exceptional supporting documents, including the DXF files for the aluminum plates. I imported these DXF files into Fusion 360 and extruded them to the specified thicknesses to create my STL files. I'd reiterate that if I were to do it over again, I would print them all at 6mm thickness for the added rigidity. If you do this, you'll make considerations for the screw lengths from the original BOM, although not sure the additional 3mm will be too big a deal.
     
  15. Steve Kingsley

    Steve Kingsley Well-Known
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    This looks like a great build. It's the route I'm planning to go down with a build of the Kyo Sphinx design. I was planning to make the plates by printing an inner core (pla) with all the holes located and strong infill, with a thickness of 2mm less than the desired thickness, then laminate 1mm aluminium to each face to form a torsion box type of plate. I'm going to use the 3D print to locate all the holes, center them and drill through once glued. I'm hoping that this would give the parts the stiffness while still not needing the CNC I have yet to build. I'm going to use Gorilla glue so I hope the bond between them PLA and the Aluminium will be strong enough.
     
    #15 Steve Kingsley, Apr 2, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2017
  16. Brian Popp

    Brian Popp Veteran
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    That's an interesting idea and I'd love to see how it works out. Curious why you wouldn't just buy 6mm aluminum and not bother with gluing/laminating, though? You can get 12x12 sheets on ebay for around $20. Seems like if you have the ability to cut/drill 1mm, 6mm wouldn't be significantly harder (just perhaps slower). I was originally toying with the idea of using 3d printed plates, but even with doubled up polycarbonate, there seemed to be too much flex.
     
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  17. Saint Billy

    Saint Billy Journeyman
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    Out of interest, what 3D printer did you use to print the parts as these are a fair size?.
     
  18. Steve Kingsley

    Steve Kingsley Well-Known
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    Well a bit about cost, but a bit about trying out something different, I have a thing for torsion boxes and seeing if you can get the same properties from lighter and cheaper materials, there's still the time cost I guess. From the cost point of view I found, 1mm x 250 x 500 = £8 vs 6mm 250 x 250 = £33. In terms of the accuracy I guess I could just use the printer to print a good jig to use for marking out and drilling.

    Any how I'll start a new build thread. @IndyMaker, I look forward to seeing any video of this cutting :)
     
  19. Steve Kingsley

    Steve Kingsley Well-Known
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    @Brian Popp - Just to say I've posted about my experience with the composite 3D printed/Aluminium plates over here: Composite plates for Sphinx build

    They are certainly rigid!!
     
  20. Brian Popp

    Brian Popp Veteran
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    Very cool Steve. Love to see new, original designs like this. I 3d printed some plates and assembled a Sphinx, and was surprised how rigid it was. I decided to try it out and have had very good results, even cutting aluminum. I still don't know how it will hold up over time, but so far it's shown no signs of wear.
     
  21. gyrex

    gyrex New
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    For anyone who's interested, I've created all the parts for 3D printing and uploaded them on Thingiverse here: Ooznest OX CNC Machine (3D Printed ABS/PETG Parts) by gyrex. I've made all of the plates 8mm thick to ensure rigidity. I don't know if making them 8mm thick will affect the dimensions of the build or not, I'll have to cross that bridge when I get to it but since ABS is cheap, I can always reprint. Be sure to print this with 75%+ infill.

    The only thing you'll need to buy is electrical gear and fasteners. All aluminium parts are included in the thingiverse file.
     
  22. Brian Popp

    Brian Popp Veteran
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    Increasing the thickness just means you'll need longer screws. This can be problematic if screws that are too long might collide/rub on anything. One way to get around this would be to cut slots for the screw heads back to the original design thickness (ie. 6.35mm). FWIW, I printed most of mine the original thickness (6mm) with ABS and didn't really have any problem with rigidity. The only plates I increased were the side gantry plates (10mm).
     
  23. gyrex

    gyrex New
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    Thanks for the tip! I'll make some recesses for the screws then. Do you think 8mm would be ok for the side gantry plates or should I increase those to 10mm thickness?

    I thought the original aluminium parts were 6mm? Are you sure they're 6.35mm?
     
  24. Brian Popp

    Brian Popp Veteran
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    Probably depends on where you source the aluminum, but the 12x12 6160 plates I bought on ebay were around 6.1mm thick. 6mm is probably a good number since most people will face off a bit. Not sure on the side plates. It's probably fine, but mine do flex a little bit @ 10mm (25% infill). It doesn't seem to be enough to affect cutting, though.
     
  25. gyrex

    gyrex New
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    Based on your advice, I've modified all the plates to 10mm thickness and provided recesses for the screws to maintain the 3 or 6mm profile (depending on the part). I don't think I'd be printing these parts any lower than a 75% infill... New, updated parts up on thingiverse and thanks for your help :)
     
    #25 gyrex, May 23, 2017
    Last edited: May 23, 2017

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